This admin helped music pirates pilfer 1 billion copyrighted tracks

Found on Ars Technica on Monday, 11 September 2017
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The admin for a prolific file-sharing site that helped pirates score more than 1 billion tracks now faces five years in prison after pleading guilty to a single count of criminal copyright infringement.

"Through ShareBeast and other related sites, this defendant profited by illegally distributing copyrighted music and albums on a massive scale," Atlanta US Attorney John Horn said. "The collective work of the FBI and our international law enforcement partners have shut down the ShareBeast websites and prevented further economic losses by scores of musicians and artists."

Funny that more and more artists begin to realize that sharing their work is a new way to attract fans so they can profit from other methods to generate income, like advertising or concerts. The bis industries keep on telling workers to be flexible, but still cling to their old business models.

Latest version of Denuvo’s DRM cracked yet again

Found on Ars Technica on Friday, 14 April 2017
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The 2Dark crack proves that the newly revamped version of the DRM is just as breakable as the old version (which was itself considered unbreakable for quite a while). That also means Mass Effect: Andromeda, which had Denuvo v4 patched in alongside other improvements after launch, may soon see a cracked version that includes the game's post-launch updates.

In the end, DRM will always fall at some point.

‘Pirate’ Movie Streaming Sites Declared Legal By Italian Court

Found on Torrentfreak on Monday, 27 March 2017
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The Court found that merely providing links does not qualify as distributing files protected by copyright, even though the sites generated revenue via advertising.

“In fact, the Judge ruled that file sharing, i.e the sharing of files protected by copyright, is a saving of expense and not a for-profit business. Therefore, in these cases you cannot apply the penal provisions of copyright law and the resulting administrative sanctions,” Sarzana notes.

Looks like some courts have a better understanding of laws than others who blindly follow the demands of the entertainment industry.

Cloudflare Puts Pirate Sites on New IP Addresses, Avoids Cogent Blockade

Found on Torrentfreak on Friday, 17 February 2017
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Last week the news broke that Cogent, which operates one of the largest Internet backbone networks, blackholed IP-addresses that were linked to several notorious sites including The Pirate Bay.

It seems likely that the change of IP-addresses is an intentional response from Cloudflare to bypass the blocking. The company has a reputation of fighting overreach and keeping its subscribers online so that it would be fitting.

Cogent only has one job: to keep the data flowing. There is no room for dubious vigilante justice by plaing Internet police.

Internet Backbone Provider Cogent Blocks Pirate Bay and other “Pirate” Sites

Found on TorrentFreak on Friday, 10 February 2017
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Their requests are being stopped in the Internet backbone network of Cogent Communications, which has blackholed the CloudFlare IP-address of The Pirate Bay and many other torrent and streaming sites.

A Cogent spokesperson informed us that they looked into the issue but that the company “does not discuss such decisions with third parties,” while adding that they do not control the DNS records of these sites.

No provider should ever censor the traffic that runs through his pipes.

ExtraTorrent Under DDoS Attacks, Pirate Bay Down

Found on TorrentFreak on Tuesday, 27 December 2016
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The problems appear to be related to the site's recent ban of 'unofficial' proxy services. Meanwhile, The Pirate Bay is also down, but for now it's unclear what's causing the issues on their end.

ExtraTorrent is not the only site that has run into trouble lately. The Pirate Bay is also down at the time of writing. Users who try to access the site get a CloudFlare downtime warning, or a new Captcha error.

Botnets are not cheap. Throwing that much traffic at a website costs money, and given enough time, the attacker will move on if nobody cares.

KickassTorrents Brought Back to Life by Original Staffers

Found on Torrentfreak on Sunday, 18 December 2016
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A few months ago a criminal investegation by the U.S. Government brought down KickassTorrents, the largest torrent site at the time.

“We have all our major uploaders on board and they continued to share tirelessly even before the torrent engines returned. The torrent community can continue to expect to see uploads from all the names they know and trust,” the KATcr crew says.

"I get knocked down, but I get up again, you're never going to keep me down."

Europe’s Net Neutrality Doesn’t Ban BitTorrent Throttling

Found on Torrentfreak on Tuesday, 30 August 2016
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The rules, which are included in the Telecoms Single Market (TSM) regulation, would still allow targeted throttling of BitTorrent and other traffic, under the guise of network management.

ISPs are still allowed to throttle specific categories for “reasonable” network management purposes, as the second subparagraph of article 3 reads.

While it’s not expected that BitTorrent or VPN traffic will be targeted any more than it is right now, the option remains open. This will be a welcome decision by networking specialists and ISPs in general, which have argued that selectively targeting congestion is a more sensible approach.

In other words, customers are facing restrictions because ISPs are overselling the capacity they have; instead of forcing them to upgrade and invest in infrastructure.

Mr. Robot ‘Plugs’ uTorrent and Pirate Release Groups

Found on TorrentFreak on Sunday, 31 July 2016
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In the most recent episode, pirates were saluted during a short scene. Without giving away any spoilers, the main character Elliot was shown playing a pirated movie via his PLEX media server.

It is safe to say that these were not included by accident but as a nod towards the pirates in the audience. The same can be said for the iconic FBI warning that’s shown when the movie starts playing.

If you follow his example however, you possibly attract unwanted attention from the entertainment industry.

Pirate Bay domain suspended thanks to controversial verification system

Found on The Register on Monday, 07 December 2015
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Broadly, the companies that sell domains to users – called registrars – are now required to send a verification email to the domain name holders every time a new domain is registered or the domain details are modified.

In theory, the validation process is extremely easy: you receive an email from your registrar and simply have to click on a link to verify that the domain's registration information is true and accurate. Then you are done.

The suspension is under ICANN's control and there is little or nothing that your registrar can do about it. The problem of course is the system relies on people receiving and responding to an email.

For years and years people are warned not to click on random links they receive via email, and ICANN wants to rely on just that. Why bother at all? As long as a domain is being paid for, someone obviuosly has an interest in it; and for "fighting terrorists" it should be simple for the feds to track the money. On the other hand, IP lawyers don't have access to that.